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Past Issue of DM Review Magazine

 
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October 2001 issue of DM Review magazine

EXECUTIVE INTERVIEWEXECUTIVE INTERVIEW

ProClarity Corporation
Bob Lokken, president and CEO of ProClarity Corporation, reveals the origin, discriminating characteristics and values of his 2001 Readership Award-winning company.


FEATURE ARTICLESFEATURE ARTICLES

Information Quality Mandate for Election Reform
By Larry English
The election processes, whether voter registration, voting or recounting, are pure "information production" processes. As such, the analysis of the Florida Presidential election provides an excellent case study in information quality improvement.
OLAP Market Review
By Nigel Pendse
Under one name or another, OLAP has been around for more than 30 years. According to The OLAP Report, the OLAP market is now larger than $3 billion. This article discusses the highlights of Survey.com's recently published study of the OLAP market.
Modern Database Administration, Part 2
By Craig S. Mullins
Database management systems are changing and growing more complex with each new version and release, requiring changes to the role of database administrator.
2001 DM Review Readership Awards
By Jean Schauer
The results are in! DM Review proudly announces the 2001 Readership Award winners.

COLUMNSCOLUMNS

Business Intelligence
No Guts, No Glory
By Susan Osterfelt

Intelligent Solutions
My Way or the Highway: Customer-Driven Personalization
By Claudia Imhoff

Information Strategy
The First Step Toward EAI: Conducting an EAI Strategic Assessment
By Jane Griffin

CEO Perspectives
Preparing for the Corner Office ? CIO as CEO? Part 1
By David A.J. Axson

Notes from the Giga Advisor
Advice Only a Vendor Could Love
By Lou Agosta

The CRM-Ready Data Warehouse
E-CRM ? A Definition
By William McKnight

Marketing Systems
Customer Matching Systems, Part 3
By David M. Raab

Meta Data & Data Administration
Repository: Buy Versus Build
By David Marco

Data Warehouse Delivery
Blue Ribbons
By Douglas Hackney

Segmentation
Cooking a Good Segmentation
By Doran J. Levy

Information Management: Charting the Course
The Cult of the New
By Bill Inmon

Customer Relationship Report
How Much is
By Melinda Nykamp and Carla McEachern
(online exclusive)

The Enterprise
Enterprise Portal Success Story: Herman Miller E-Business Portal
By Clive Finkelstein
(online exclusive)

Data Warehousing Horizons
Global Customer Care Utilizing Data Warehouse and Web Technology
By John Huffman
(online exclusive)

Document Warehousing & Content Management
ETL Meets Content Management
By Dan Sullivan
(online exclusive)

View From the Market
Technology and Professional Services
By Nancy Stewart
(online exclusive)

Information for Innovation
Developing an Enterprise Data Strategy
By Nancy Mullen

DAMA
Message from the Vice President of Education and Special Projects
By Deborah Henderson


PRODUCT REVIEWSPRODUCT REVIEWS

 

AOS Creates Managed Business Intelligence Applications for Empower IT
ACG (Application Consulting Group, Inc.) - AOS (Active OLAP Suite)

 

CA's Forest & Trees Stands Tall For Royal & SunAlliance USA
Computer Associates International, Inc. - CleverPath Forest & Trees

 

Telephia Utilizes Databeacon for Extranet Delivery of Product to Customers
Databeacon Inc. - Databeacon

 

a-dec Solves its Growing Information Management Problem with Comshare Business Intelligence Software
Geac - Comshare Decision

 

Trimac Trucks Along with Hummingbird Genio Suite
Hummingbird Ltd. - Genio Suite

 

Hyperion and stealthCFO Bring Business Intelligence to the Web Via Essbase
Hyperion Solutions Corporation - Essbase

 

Building a Self-Service Reporting Environment for Employees and Clients
Information Builders, Inc. - Information Builders WebFOCUS

 

Insightful Delivers the Right Medicine for Janssen Pharmaceutica
Insightful Corporation - StatServer

 

GE Capital Fleet Services Enhances Fleet Management Productivity with MicroStrategy 7
MicroStrategy Incorporated - MicroStrategy 7 Business Intelligence Platform

 

WebQL Delivers Selective Web Content to Wireless Devices in Real Time
OL2 Software Inc. (Formerly Caesius Software, Inc.) - Caesius WebQL

 

AT&T; Broadband Operationalizes Its Market Strategy with Peak Market Center
PeakEffects, Inc. - Peak Market Center Version 2.1

 

Subaru-Isuzu Automotive Strengthens Organization Through pbviews Performance Measurement Solution
performancesoft Inc. - pbviews

 

Edwards Theatres Reels in ROI with ProClarity
ProClarity Corporation - ProClarity Analytics Platform

 

Sempra Energy Finds Increased Custom Report Efficiency with SAP BW
SAP - SAP Business Information Warehouse (SAP BW)

 

125-year-old Spice Company Takes a Fresh Look at Profits
Silvon Software, Inc. - Silvon Stratum

 

Cytyc Sales Force Intuitively Configures Comprehensive Reports with Panorama
StayinFront, Inc. - Panorama

 

Virtual Strategy Provides Enterprise Profitability Solution with Scenario Management for Eastern Bank
Virtual Strategy, Inc. - Virtual Strategy microCube Application Server Version 2.0

 

EDS Selects Visual Insights' eBizinsights XL for Web Marketing Performance
Visual Insights - eBizinsights XL



From the Publisher

Dear Readers,

As we are all well aware, the economic picture in the technology sector has been rather dismal of late. Especially in the past month, it seems everyone wants to know if we've hit bottom and if we can expect improvement in the near term. Based on conversations with a number of companies, it appears we can be cautiously optimistic about the future. The new economy pendulum had swung to such a major extreme that it will undoubtedly be some time before it returns to its natural position, and companies will probably overcorrect in that direction before stabilizing. The truth is that the Internet created a new channel for communications, and the amount of new investment in this area received such an influx of capital that it prevented companies in the old economy from obtaining money to enhance their businesses. Now that a significant amount of capital has been squandered on weak business models, we are returning to the norm with regard to profit expectations – and expect continued improvement. While times have been rough economically, we have learned valuable lessons over the past two years including:

1) The Internet is a channel to reach the customer and must be incorporated with all other touchpoints in the organization.

2) The Internet has reduced the cost of doing business by eliminating a lot of costs with regard to intermediaries.

3) The Internet has increased the speed at which corporations conduct business, and a large number of sell cycles have been compressed.

4) The Internet must be incorporated into the overall strategy of the corporation and cannot function as a standalone entity.

5) E-mail has greatly enhanced communication, but at the same time must be controlled and filtered to remove the noise. Junk e-mail and spam negatively affect efficiency in many corporations today.

6) Technology must provide a measurable ROI and profits do matter, as most employees of the now defunct dot-coms would attest.

I am sure there are other significant lessons to be learned from the mania of the past two years, yet these lessons are significant because they to some degree justify the tremendous amount of money we have invested in technology over the past two years. Hopefully, we will see dramatic economic improvement in months ahead.




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